Tag Archives: book

Pride vs The Fall

I wouldn’t call myself a proud person.  I don’t spout off about my achievements and am a typically very humble person. But maybe I am doing it all wrong?

Proud people tend to rise through life never even realising that they are, stepping over everything that gets in their way. They may not be considered nice, but who needs nice when you own your own empire?

People who promote their achievements get the job, get the work recognition and get the pay rises. Humble people are labelled as shy and are often forgotten. Perhaps I should take a leaf out of the proud people book?

They say pride comes before the fall. However in today’s society, the proud confident people seem to keep rising and rising and never fall. And in the case of celebrities, if they do fall, it’s all good publicity.

I think this idea is out dated as many successful people today now admit and promote the fact that they had failures before they succeeded. Failures are seen as learning experiences to educate your future successes and make you seem human. And failing is better than never trying at all in a lot of cases.

Plus you can always write a tell-all book about it. As Sarah Lewis says in her new book- “In order to succeed you must fail first- and fail hard.” So I guess pride can be a good thing- especially if the fall never comes.

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What came in best- the book or the movie?

After seeing Gone Girl on the long weekend, I got to thinking about movies based on books.

The general rule is that the book is always better than the movie. I think this is because your own imagination is better than anything they can produce in Hollywood. It is also a testament to the quality of writing that provides the back story and inner thoughts of the characters as the action unfolds.

In the case of Gone Girl, I think the movie was better in some ways. By not providing her back story, the lead character Amy seems even more terrifying. However, the media beat up about the ending being different was wrong – the last line was different, but the result was the same.

Also, as much as I love him, I don’t think Ben Affleck being cast as Nick was the right choice. He was just not slick enough and not how I imagined the character to be at all. Perhaps Matt Damon would have been a better choice? (ha ha!).

I had a similar problem with Twilight. In the book, the character was a strong female, but in the first movie Kristen Stewart was just whiny! The trilogy did improve as the confidence of the actors and special effects did, but the inner dialogue between the wolves was not the best- although it is a hard concept to communicate through film.

One Day stayed true to the book, but somehow still missed the mark in making the transition from good film to great film. Perhaps due to the casting?

He’s just not that into you was very well done- I liked the intersecting stories and the casting was brilliant. I think the movie was actually far better than the book as it fictionalised the non-fiction which made it more personal.

Both the Devil Wears Prada and Confessions of a Shopaholic were excellent as books and as movies. The light hearted content make them very adaptable. Kudos to fellow Aussie chick Isla Fisher for playing the kooky character Becky in the latter perfectly- one might say even better than in the book.

Bridget Jones’s Diary was a great movie which earned a bit of a cult following. The sequel, not so much. Both movies stayed true to the book, so I’m not really sure what happened there?!

The same thing happened with the Sex and the City movie. First film good, second one a flop. Perhaps sequels are never as good as the originals. I’m pretty sure that was a lesson we already learnt in the 80’s right?!

The first Lord of the Rings movie was nowhere near as good as the books and I stopped watching after the first one. As previously mentioned, my dad used to read the books to me as a child, so perhaps my memory will always be greater than the movies.

I thought Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo and Juliet was a very clever adaption to bring Shakespeare’s play into the 20th Century. The racy music and well-timed action would have been easy to understand even for those without the knowledge of the playwright and ye olde English.

Anne Rice’s Interview with the Vampire didn’t have enough of Louis’s back story at the beginning, but made up for it in the greatly gothic rest of the film. The sequel, The Queen of the Damned, was a terrible adaptation of the book. Anne Rice was not involved in the screenplay (as she was in Interview with the Vampire), which is an essential ingredient in a successful book to movie shift.

So here you have it- my golden rules for a successful adaptation from book to movie:

  1. Stay true to the book content
  2. Appropriate character casting
  3. Get the author of the book involved in the movie screenplay
  4. Don’t bother with the sequel

Cut!

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Kicking goals

My first life goal was to travel to every country in the world. But when my dad’s friend told me he was fifty and not even close, I thought that this goal may be impossible.

When it was time to choose a job, I felt like there were too many options and failed to choose definitively as a result. I started in print production, tried architectural visualisation, was an Executive Assistant and dabbled in PR before I fell into events.

I am not one for career goal setting. My most hated question is still “where do you see yourself in five years?” I am more of a doer than a manager and never aspire to manage anyone except myself.

I once read an Anthony Robbins book about excelling and goal setting- visualisation and making a plan. Some of what he said made sense and I pictured myself as a travel writer working for the Lonely Planet and living in San Francisco with my pet Labrador.

Mr. Robbins said anything was possible, but maybe he wasn’t thinking about the difficulty of getting a green card at the time. I also consider myself a realist, so found it pretty improbable that everyone in the world can be successful as he claimed.

My parents weren’t career people either. They worked to live which meant a house and enough money for the next holiday. As a result I have no pressure to earn money and many great travelling memories.

It didn’t occur to be ambitious, plan to own property or get married. I am not much of a consumer either. I don’t buy designer handbags or keep up with fashion. I never really think further than booking the next trip overseas.

I heard someone say the other day that if you have low expectations, they are fulfilled- so perhaps that’s why I am content. I don’t feel the struggle to reach goals in work or life or to have things.

Popular culture teaches us that we should pursue our goals to the expenses of all others, stepping on anyone or anything that gets in our way. We have to sacrifice everything for our ultimate goal and make ourselves heard.

My ultimate goal is to be a columnist, publish a book and continue travelling the world. But are these goals realistic? And if so, what am I doing with a day job? Should I be putting all my skills and resources into travelling and writing this blog, in the hope that someone will love my travel writing and want me to be a columnist or publish a book, ignoring the fact that I still need to earn money to survive?

I guess what I am getting at, is trying to find the happy medium between making your goals happen and living in the real world.

Let me know when you have the answer ok?

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