Tag Archives: castle

Tokyo Disneysea, 2016

On our last day in Japan we went to Tokyo Disneysea. It was slightly smaller than Disneyland, so we had plenty of time in the day to go on all the rides that our daughter wanted to, and some that my husband and I wanted to go on too.

We walked through the entry gates where there was a big globe fountain and Mickey and Minnie Mouse were putting on a welcome show. There was also a golden ship to commemorate the 15th anniversary of Disneysea.

In front of us was the Mediterranean Harbour and it really did look like Europe. There was the Ponte Vecchio, a fortification tower, Venetian palace buildings and cobblestoned alleyways. Our first ride was in a submarine into the middle of the volcano- 20,000 leagues under the sea.

My favourite Disney princess was Ariel so we headed straight for Mermaid Lagoon after that. A tunnel led from the outside to an indoor cave that was dark and glowing with lights and several themed rides for smaller children- we went on them all- and found a few Ariel’s posing in Ariel’s playground.

The highlight was sitting in the front row of King Triton’s Concert starring Ariel the mermaid on acrobatic strings, Flounder and Sebastian as puppets, Triton as a huge moving statue and Ariel’s sisters as holograms videos. It was very entertaining.

Next we went to the Arabian Coast where Princess Jasmine lives and it really looked like an Arabian town, with a walled city, marketplace, archways and a replica of the Lion fountain usually found in the Spanish Alhambra. Some Jasmine’s could be found taking photos here.

Our daughter went on the double storey Carousel and we all went on the flying carpets and into the Genie’s 3D show, which was very good. We also stopped in the Casbah food court for a curry lunch- very tasty.

From here we walked passed the Mexican temples and caught the steamboat through old American looking towns to the American Waterfront and it really looked like America. There was a big ship, a San Francisco tram, a town square and a New York City street.

Mickey, Minnie, Daisy, Donald, Goofy, Pluto, Chip and Dale were putting on a show at the ship and we saw the special Halloween show in the harbour on boats with evil characters such as Ursula, Captain Hook and Jaffar. It was very clever, but very loud.

In Port Discovery we met Goofy and Mrs Incredible and went on the Aquatopia water ride, which was a lot of fun. We ended the day inside the castle where the adults shared an adult drink and an oversized turkey leg.

We left just as it was getting dark to catch our plane back to Sydney. Japan had been a great holiday. Good food, nice people, easy with kids and plenty to see and do from cultural to technological activities. We would definitely be back again.

Related posts: Tokyo Disneyland, 2016The Great Buddha, Nara, 2016Nara, 2016Castle and shopping in Osaka, 2016Osaka, 2016Onsen in Nantan, 2016Markets and Manga in Kyoto, 2016Gion, Kyoto, 2016Food and Fervour in Kyoto, 2016Kyoto, 2016Takeyama, 2016Samurai and Shidax in Kanazawa, 2016Seeking Geisha and Gardens in Kanazawa, 2016Kanazawa, 2016Tokyo, 2016: MiraikanTokyo, 2016: Shinjuku, Tsukiji Market and YanakaTokyo, 2016: Imperial Palace and ShibuyaTokyo, 2016: Ueno and HarajukuJapan, 2016

Tokyo Disneyland, 2016

We arrived at the Sheraton- one of the Disneyland resorts- and were upgraded to a penguin room. The penguin is the mascot of the hotel and they devote a whole floor to him including games, carpet, doors, bedspreads and furniture. Our daughter loved it.

The hotel also had a kids soft play area following a similar theme, electronic games, a miniature golf course and even an area where you can dress up as your favourite Disney character for a personalised photo shoot. Our daughter’s favourite game was the Sofia the First one where a hologram dressed her like the princess.

I was more impressed with the rest of the hotel including waterfall, two swimming pools, ocean views and even a fancy dessert bar with a fairy floss machine. My husband was most impressed with the fact that we could see the Disneyland castle and Disneysea volcano from our balcony and all we had to do was take a short monorail trip to get there.

We went to bed early- it was going to be a big two days.

I was so excited for our daughter’s first trip to Disneyland that I woke up before her. She dressed up in her Rapunzel dress that we had bought in Osaka with matching crown and princess doll that we had brought on our trip to Japan.

When we arrived at the Disneyland gates, we discovered that all the adults were dressed up too as this is allowed only for the week before Halloween. It made the day even better, the atmosphere was amazing and our daughter got to meet all the princesses.

There was another Rapunzel, Snow Whites, many Elsa’s, Jasmine, some Anna’s, Sleeping Beauty, a few Cinderella’s, Ariel, and even a Sophia, Amber and Princess Ivy. And of course there were many other Disney characters too, from Alice in Wonderland to Judy Hopps from Zootopia.

Our first ride was the Star Jets on the way to Toontown. Then we lined up for an hour to meet Mickey Mouse. It was worth it of course and while we waited, we took turns on the rides there with our daughter- Gadgets Go Coaster, Goofy’s House, Daisy’s Boat and Chip and Dale’s House.

We also met Pluto, bought a refillable Dumbo popcorn holder and saw the special Halloween parade with all the classic Disney characters- Mickey, Minnie, Daisy, Donald, Goofy and Pluto.

Fantasyland was exactly how I remembered it being in Los Angeles, but even better. There was the classic cups ride, the carousel, the flying Dumbo ride and you could actually go inside Cinderella’s castle to try on her glass slipper.

We went on a couple more rides in Tomorrowland, like the Monster’s Inc ride, and hit Adventureland when darkness hit. I love the New Orleans quarter here so we ate dinner in a café before riding Pirates of the Caribbean, another classic.

After a few more rides, it was time to call it on a very long day, put a happy little girl to sleep and watch the fireworks from our balcony.

Related posts: The Great Buddha, Nara, 2016Nara, 2016Castle and shopping in Osaka, 2016Osaka, 2016Onsen in Nantan, 2016Markets and Manga in Kyoto, 2016Gion, Kyoto, 2016Food and Fervour in Kyoto, 2016Kyoto, 2016Takeyama, 2016Samurai and Shidax in Kanazawa, 2016Seeking Geisha and Gardens in Kanazawa, 2016Kanazawa, 2016Tokyo, 2016: MiraikanTokyo, 2016: Shinjuku, Tsukiji Market and YanakaTokyo, 2016: Imperial Palace and ShibuyaTokyo, 2016: Ueno and HarajukuJapan, 2016

Castle and shopping in Osaka, 2016

The main thing I wanted to see in Osaka was the castle. My husband, daughter and I passed a museum on the walk from the train station where people were lining up and there was some sort of travelling circus with large lizards and eagles.

As we neared the castle, I could spot a green roof looming above trees and I knew we must be close. We crossed the moat that was lined with willow trees and autumn leaves with a few boats floating by.

Stone walls surrounded the castle grounds from which there was a good view of the city. We walked around Osaka Castle, which turned out to have more white washed storeys than I first saw from afar, and lots of impressive gold embellishment.

There were large topiary trees, a huge rock out front and vending machines around the castle. My daughter asked- where are the king and queen of the castle? And I really didn’t know, so I bought her a Lady Borden ice cream on a stick instead.

We returned to Shinsaibashi-suji by day to shop, as this was our last city stop before going home. My daughter stocked up on Hello Kitty paraphernalia and chose Rapunzel as her first princess dress.

My husband bought souvenirs for his family and a sake set for us in Tokyo Hands; and souvenirs for friends at the Kit Kat shop. I found a gorgeous red jacket in Stradivarius, a funky shop that I had never heard of, and had to have it. And of course we hit Uniqlo and H&M.

After half a day focussed on shopping, I got a bit disconcerted by the chorus of thankyou’s, so we stopped for a nice lunch in a traditional style restaurant below street level. Every little dish had a plate of its own making the presentation very appealing.

We returned to our modern apartment with the many confusing light switches and buttons for a rest, before heading back out to a local restaurant that specialised in tempura for dinner.

Related posts: Osaka, 2016Onsen in Nantan, 2016Markets and Manga in Kyoto, 2016Gion, Kyoto, 2016Food and Fervour in Kyoto, 2016Kyoto, 2016Takeyama, 2016Samurai and Shidax in Kanazawa, 2016Seeking Geisha and Gardens in Kanazawa, 2016Kanazawa, 2016Tokyo, 2016: MiraikanTokyo, 2016: Shinjuku, Tsukiji Market and YanakaTokyo, 2016: Imperial Palace and ShibuyaTokyo, 2016: Ueno and HarajukuJapan, 2016

Belgium, 2013: The Place

Our week of nights in Belgium had filled up quickly; so one afternoon my husband, daughter and I went to our friends house- Corrine and Ben- for a traditional French style lunch: our favourite. Corrine and Ben had a multi story home in the village of Tilff which was bright with all the autumn colours on the tress outside. They had two older kids of their own and I still remember how sweet Corrine was as I was distraught when our daughter fell off the couch. She was fine of course.

We walked around Dolembreux one morning, to the war memorial, the school and the fields behind the farmhouse. It was such a pretty little village and I could see why it would be a nice place to raise kids.

Another day we headed into Liege where we all enjoyed some authentic waffles and a walk around the city. We went to H&M and Mango of course and visited one of Steve’s friends who worked in a shoe shop in town.

Finding a car seat of the right age was easy with so many kids around. Although she did mange to wriggle out of it that morning as we were driving back from the city that day. Bit scary, but I think she was just trying to look out of the window rather than open the door.

We went to visit Yves in his nice house on the hill and he gave us a book of Liege photos that he had published. One lunchtime we went to the restaurant that Ben’s partner owned in Tilff. It was bright and airy and served the best baguettes.

Bill took the day off work to take us to Durbuy- reportably the most beautiful village in Belgium and a place where neither my husband or I had been before. It was ridiculously picturesque, even in the cold weather, with small cobbled streets lined with stone houses covered with red and green vines. There was an actual castle, a fort and a spa and the small town was encircled by rocks, fountains, water wheels and the river.

Our  daughter fell asleep easily in the pram as we trundled along and we kept warm by eating Chokotoffs– hard carmel treats covered in Cote d’Or chocolate. We stopped for lunch in a nice traditional French restaurant and drove home munching on sour gummies. All in all it was a day of beauty and eating.

With so many adoptive aunts and uncles, our daughter received lots of presents and hand me down clothing that necessitated a big rethink of packing the bag when we left. It was great for her to receive French speaking toys and good quality warm winter clothing, so it was an easy choice to pass on some of her clothes that we had brought that she was outgrowing anyway and we knew that they would go to a good home here.

Related posts: Belgium, 2013: The PeopleEurope, 2006, Belgium, 1997, People vs Place

It’s a European Thing

A trip around Europe is a backpacker right of passage, especially if you’re an Aussie. Staying in hostels, bumping into the same people on same route and exploring the other side of the world.

Most enter through the gateway of Amsterdam, a city whose liberal attitude may appear shocking to most, intriguing to some and even normal to others.

I remember the flatness of Holland and the smallness of Belgium where you could pass through it and be in 3 countries in one day. There is the beauty of the canals of Bruges and the discovery of Italy, where every city is different.

There is the history of Rome and Pompeii, the craziness of Venice and the little gems you find along the way, like Verona. And then there are more ruins in Athens.

It’s the Asian culture of Istanbul that leaves you wanting more and the bleakness of Eastern Europe on the cusp of Russia. Closely followed by the opulence of Vienna.

Then there is the gothic wonderland of Prague, before finishing off with party time in Berlin.

My first trip to Europe still lives brightly in my memory, even though it was taken a lifetime ago. Each country had a different culture, language and even a different currency.

No matter how many times I go to Europe, there always seems to be more to see.

I have never been to Scandinavia, Liechtenstein or Poland. I missed Ghent in Belgium and countless other places in Italy.

Like Cinque Terre, Siena and the Amalfi coast. I never got to properly taste wine in Tuscany, see the fountains at Tivoli or go to the island of Sicily.

I missed out on visiting an island in Greece, I’m sure Eastern Europe is quite different now to what it was then; and the Cesky Kromlov seems to be the place to go now instead of Prague.

I know there is more to Germany than just Berlin, like Dresden, seeing Sleeping Beauty’s castle and shopping at a Christmas market.

I can’t wait for my next magical European experience even if it is not in the near future, because a continent this diverse is definitely worth waiting for.

Related posts: It’s an English Thing, It’s a Spanish Thing, It’s a water thing, It’s a French Thing, Europe, 2006, Europe, 2003, England, 2002, Berlin, 1997, Part 2: To the East

Slovenia, 2010

From Croatia, my husband and I caught the train to Ljubljana, Slovenia. Having been disappointed with our honeymoon hotel in Dubrovnik, we decided to splash out for our last stop so we stayed at the Hotel Slon. Here, we finally got a free honeymoon gift in the form of a fruit plater, models milled around the lobby and I was excited to discover that there was a H & M next door. The surrounding area also had lots of old bank buildings, each one different.

There were dragons everywhere in Ljubljana- on lamp posts, on the town hall spire, on the castle gates and in the National Gallery. I finally caved and bought a dragon of my own to take home. It was also was a town of pretty squares. There was the colourful Presernov square with a Franciscan church and a scale model of city; Mesti square with the Rome-like Robba fountain; Stari square with the Hercules fountain and Gornji square with the medieval houses. The New square was no so interesting after all of these.

There were many bridges to cross in the city- the famous Triple bridge, Cobblers bridge and my favourite, the Dragon’s bridge. We found a great market lining the bank of the Ljubljana River and were amused by the statues of queuing people at the museum entry. There was an interesting water feature on the ground in an alleyway and the door on the Cathedral of St Nicholas also had much bronze detailing.

We visted a wine bar, had goulash that was so good that we went back on another night, and just enjoyed being in such an unexpectedly cosmopolitan city.

Forsaking the funicular, we walked up Studentovska St to Ljubljana castle for a stroll along the castle rampart. We saw the pentagonal tower and the beautiful ornate ceiling in the Chapel of St George. The view of the city from Razgledni Stolp tower was fantastic.

We took a day trip to Bled and walked around the lake. Bled castle appeared to be perched precariously on the edge of a cliff surrounded by snowy mountains. Passing the castle baths with bathing swans we came upon many Swiss looking houses.

Bled island in the middle of the lake had the baroque Church of Assumption and the prominent south staircase to the Chaplains house. It was nice to pass by streams feeding the lake and we stopped at a bar for lunch halfway around.

Others had caught boats, swan gondolas, horse and cart’s or the train to get around the lake, but I was glad that we took our time to see things like the resting dragonfly that landed on my husbands arm. It was a very romantic way to end the honeymoon before we made a short stop in England to surprise my grandma who had been unable to make it to Thailand for the wedding.

Related posts: Luxury Istria, 2010, Pag and Buzet, 2010, Split and Zadar, 2010, Dubrovnik, 2010, Destination Thailand, 2010