Tag Archives: drinking

Destination Thailand, 2010

In 2010, my husband-to-be (HTB) and I returned to Kaw Kwang Beach where he had proposed one year earlier, to get married.

The idea had been planted by the Cha Da Beach Resort & Spa manager as we had left post engagement in 2009. We didn’t want a big wedding, but we love to travel; and so the decision to have a destination wedding was made.

The resort were quite happy to accommodate our request and provide their first Western wedding ceremony (and third wedding ever), including accommodation upgrade to a Diamond Villa with private plunge pool.

We politely declined the offer of a Thai celebrity to perform the ceremony or a local band to play at the reception and proceeded to invite as many people as we wanted, thinking that we would be lucky to have family and a few friends there.

I am fortunate enough to have both a photographer and hair/make-up artist as friends so that was easily taken care of; and we purchased last minute table gifts of carved wooden candle holders from a local artisan in Ban Saladan.

Having our wedding Thailand was awesome as the people are so friendly and they added little cultural quirks that unintentionally made us smile, like writing “Welcom Black” in flower petals on our bed for our arrival.

As it was off-season, the only other people at the resort was a German family so we mostly had the place to ourselves. In fact, the day after the wedding the monsoon kicked in it poured rain at the exact same time we got married on the beach the previous day.

In the end, we had 50 guests attend from all over the world. It truly felt like an international wedding with guests from Europe, America, Asia and Australia. I was lucky enough to have a few of my besties and a couple of cousins in attendance which was fantastic.

Most people arrived the week before, so by the time the wedding day arrived everyone had gotten the chance to know one another as they had bumped into each other at the pool bar in the day, attended a large group dinner in town or a late night drinking session in our plunge pool. Some of guests even chose to explore the area by going on day trips with newly made friends they had met at the resort.

The ceremony was held at sunset on the beach and the little extras that I didn’t know about that the resort provided were very touching. They threw flower petals on us as we walked along the beach and all the lovely staff came to watch the wedding.

The reception was an amazing Thai seafood BBQ buffet dinner, it was hot and everyone was drinking. By the end of the night people were dancing crazily, had the food labels from the buffet on their sweaty heads and ended up jumping in the pool once we had left for the night. People are still talking about how much fun it was years later.

I would do it all again in a second and am looking forward to returning to Cha Da for one of our wedding anniversaries soon. Hopefully with a few of our wedding guests in tow.

Photography by Richard Miller.

Related posts: Thailand, 2009, Thailand, 2002

England, 2006

My first overseas trip with my husband-to-be (HTB) was to Weymouth to introduce him to my grandmother. My dad was also visiting at the time, so we caught up with friends old and newer. Alan and Viv cooked us the best roast I’ve ever had. One of Sarah’s brother’s friends had his 30th birthday at a local pub so we went along to share a few beverages with my old drinking crew.

I showed my HTB, Perry’s where I had worked the summer on Weymouth harbour and the sea front where I had spent my time off on the beach. We saw a very cool live band in a local pub as he loves live music.

We took my HTB on the usual tour of Tyneham Village, Corfe Castle, the Man of War at Lulworth Cove and Stonehenge. We also went to a few pubs including the Red Lion in Weymouth, The Cove House Inn at Portland and the Square and Compass in Worth Matravers for the warmest cider on the planet.

For a healthier alternative, we climbed up to Hardy’s Monument and visited the town of Cerne Abbas with its ancient monastery and large Abbey Farm House. We went to Cirencester to visit family, Bourton-on-the-Water and Bibury to see Arlington Row.

It was nice to show my HTB where I had come from and the places that were so much a part of my childhood and trips away.

My HTB had been to London before, but at a time when he had done more drinking than sight-seeing. So I dragged him around on a whirlwind tour of my favourite iconic sights- Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, Buckingham Palace, Trafalgar Square, Piccadilly Circus, St James Park, the River Thames, Oxford St and Covent Garden.

This time I got to go on the London Eye and we had a rare clear day affording great views of the city, the Houses of Parliament, Buckingham Palace and the new to me Millennium Bridge. I also got to see the awesome media centre at Lords Cricket Ground and sit in the captain’s chair on the HMS Belfast – two things I never would have done in London before meeting my HTB.

Between us, we had lots of family and friends living and working in London- both local and Australian. So, rather than spending days driving all around the city visiting people, we organised a night to meet everyone at once at The Horniman at Hays which had a view of the Tower Bridge and most importantly- lots of beer for more drinking.

Related posts: Europe, 2003England, 2002, England, 1997,England, Singapore and Malaysia, 1988 

It’s all in the attitude

Recent happenings have made me think about the great Aussie attitude of making a positive out of a negative.

We are generally known as a friendly, easy going bunch. No worries, she’ll be right, throw another shrimp on the barbie and all that.

When the elements, the world and people conspire against us, we keep battling and promote the good that comes out of these events.

Bush fires are raging away, but the fire fighters rescued a koala.

Terror attack resulting in racial fear on public transport, it’s all good, #illlridewithyou.

One-punch attacks after too many drinks, don’t worry, we have lock-out laws now.

Perhaps it’s all that sunshine and Vitamin D that makes us a positive nation that just gets on with it. We are known worldwide for our beautiful beaches after all.

Australia is also a multicultural country with us all having been immigrants at some point (unless you are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander of course). We may not all be culturally integrated, but we are all from somewhere else.

Aussies themselves are slated as hard drinkers. Most public holidays are centred on public drinking, like we needed an excuse to have a beer at the pub anyway?! Melbourne even has a public holiday dedicated to gambling and drinking.

This year I plan to try to live the Aussie attitude to the fullest and turn all negatives into positives, but is that realistic? Maybe sometimes things are just bad?

The fact that we are affected by global warming is a reality.

Racial tensions in our society do exist.

Public violence due to drinking happens.

But what are you going to do about it?

I pledge to reduce, reuse and recycle more, never judge a person by their ethnicity as always and keep my drinking to a manageable level as much as possible; which is about as close to new year’s resolutions as I have ever gotten!

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What’s in a number?

I am going to my cousin’s 21st birthday this weekend and I must admit I am a little afraid.

If it’s anything like the year of 21st’s that I went to when I was 21 it will involve buying a hip flask or a vase as a present depending on your gender, dressing up in impractical fancy dress, drinking far too much and mixing drinks, dancing crazily, throwing up, drinking some more and waking up in either a car or a barn.

I feel like I am far too old to be contemplating such activities and am quite glad it’s actually not expected of me at my age. It has a time and place, but I prefer to enjoy my weekend DAYS now rather than spending them hung-over until it’s time to start drinking again.

So, it got me thinking about what makes me feel old?

When I delayed university for two years and then had to enter as a mature age student- that label made me feel old.

When I asked one of my younger friends if they liked “Things that make you go Hmmm” and they didn’t know who C & C Music Factory were- that made me feel old.

When I realised I got my belly button piercing BEFORE it was cool- this made me feel old, but also very cool so that was ok.

When I turned 25, I had a quarter-life crisis. So by the time I turned 30, I was over feeling old due to the age that I was.

When I think of all the technology advances I have seen in my lifetime- that is the best indicator of the path of time. In the past, the move from records to tapes seemed huge. But now, technology moves at such a fast rate I have seen the move from tapes to CD’s to MP3 players to iTunes.

When I went on my first trip to Europe by myself I had to use pay phones to keep in touch with my parents. Now there are mobile phones, email, Facebook and Skype.

Finally, when I got a mortgage, got married and had a child- this really made me feel old! So maybe feeling old is directly proportionate to the amount of responsibilities you have in your life?

But at the end of the day, age is just a number, not how we feel. And we are all still 21 on the inside right?

Related posts: Cocktail Hour in Sydneytown, Get your groove on, By special request