Tag Archives: goal

To Belong

There’s nothing quite like that sense of belonging. Being part of company, a team and an event tribe. Believing in the organisation’s mission and being connected to the people around you.

When you believe in a company and what they stand for, it’s so much easier to understand the reasons decisions are made and put up with the stuff you don’t like about a job. You have a unified goal and a reason to keep going.

Being part of a team of people is the best too. Sure it’s about the company and the job, but at the end of the day it’s also about the people. I am sure we’ve all stayed too long in crappy jobs because the people were super nice. I mean you spend 8 hours a day with these people, so it’s a lot easier if you like them!

It’s the in jokes, the fact that someone cares if you don’t show up in the morning, the camaraderie and the shared enemies. It’s what draws people together and keeps the day-to-day activities interesting.

Working on an event with work colleagues have been some of my most enjoyable times as being part of a team. You all band together to solve on the ground problems and spend social evenings together in a more relaxed setting. It’s when you really bond with people, learn all their secrets and see a different side to their personality with the change of environment.

Sometimes, if you are lucky, you end up in a job you love, for a company you like with lifelong friends. I myself am yet to find the holy trinity, but it’s early days yet, considering that I am probably only halfway through my career.

For some, working for another company doesn’t work at all and they are much better off working for themselves. They don’t need that personal contact. Or do they? I think we all need to feel connected. Not all of the time perhaps, but sometimes.

Which is why suppliers are so great. They give you that sense of belonging and working towards a common goal without having to be in your face with their annoying habits all the time. Also, they have to be nicer to you than co-workers.

For me, when I loose respect for the boss, wether it be my immediate manager or the CEO, that’s the begging of the end. Everything flows from the top and the ripple effect causes me to fall back into old habits, begin to disengage from the company, stop caring about the people politics and start looking at Seek online.

And that’s when the true test of who people really are begins.

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Dreams vs Reality

A couple of weeks ago, it was I Want 2 Be Day for the Kids Cancer Project.

And it got me thinking about what I wanted to be when I grew up.

At first I wanted to be a ballerina, then a nurse and pretty much whatever else my older girl cousin wanted to be.

Then I wanted to be a writer and spent hours writing and illustrating stories about birthday parties I went to and sequels for some of the characters from the books I read.

In high school it seemed like it was a bit early to be deciding what I wanted to be. I just knew that I liked Geography and Society and Culture, but what sort of job could you get with that?

I envied the people that knew they wanted to be doctors and lawyers and had a clear study path set out before them.

So, I took a year off, went travelling, came back, took another year off, and eventually decided to give this writing thing a go and study for a BA Communication (Journalism).

At university, I enjoyed public relations and editing and publishing and despaired at the reality that real journalism jobs were not well paid and hard to find.

So I worked for a print production company because they employed me, worked for an architectural visualisation firm because it sounded interesting and tried PR which I found I actually hated in practice.

I worked for various not-for-profits and charities and discovered there that I was good at event organising, but was it really what I wanted to be?

So I took some writing courses at the Australian Writer’s Centre and started writing a blog in my spare time. Isn’t it funny how life has turned a full circle and now I want to be a writer again?

I guess a dream is only a dream until you make it a reality.

Perhaps I lacked direction, focus and certainty about my dream before, but now I can see that it could become reality.

Maybe in the past I expected my dream to be clear and happen easily and quickly. Now I realise that dreams take time and effort and that’s what makes them a dream in the first place.

It’s a long term goal that if you didn’t really want to do, you wouldn’t have the drive to make a reality.

It’s that niggling thought in the back of your head, that won’t go away no matter how unrealistic it seems.

We live in a world where career changes are possible, going back to study is acceptable and changing your mind is allowed.

So, what did you want to be when you grew up? Perhaps it’s time to revisit that dream and take stock of your reality?

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Kicking goals

My first life goal was to travel to every country in the world. But when my dad’s friend told me he was fifty and not even close, I thought that this goal may be impossible.

When it was time to choose a job, I felt like there were too many options and failed to choose definitively as a result. I started in print production, tried architectural visualisation, was an Executive Assistant and dabbled in PR before I fell into events.

I am not one for career goal setting. My most hated question is still “where do you see yourself in five years?” I am more of a doer than a manager and never aspire to manage anyone except myself.

I once read an Anthony Robbins book about excelling and goal setting- visualisation and making a plan. Some of what he said made sense and I pictured myself as a travel writer working for the Lonely Planet and living in San Francisco with my pet Labrador.

Mr. Robbins said anything was possible, but maybe he wasn’t thinking about the difficulty of getting a green card at the time. I also consider myself a realist, so found it pretty improbable that everyone in the world can be successful as he claimed.

My parents weren’t career people either. They worked to live which meant a house and enough money for the next holiday. As a result I have no pressure to earn money and many great travelling memories.

It didn’t occur to be ambitious, plan to own property or get married. I am not much of a consumer either. I don’t buy designer handbags or keep up with fashion. I never really think further than booking the next trip overseas.

I heard someone say the other day that if you have low expectations, they are fulfilled- so perhaps that’s why I am content. I don’t feel the struggle to reach goals in work or life or to have things.

Popular culture teaches us that we should pursue our goals to the expenses of all others, stepping on anyone or anything that gets in our way. We have to sacrifice everything for our ultimate goal and make ourselves heard.

My ultimate goal is to be a columnist, publish a book and continue travelling the world. But are these goals realistic? And if so, what am I doing with a day job? Should I be putting all my skills and resources into travelling and writing this blog, in the hope that someone will love my travel writing and want me to be a columnist or publish a book, ignoring the fact that I still need to earn money to survive?

I guess what I am getting at, is trying to find the happy medium between making your goals happen and living in the real world.

Let me know when you have the answer ok?

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