Tag Archives: Mornington Peninsula

10 top wineries to go to in the Mornington Peninsula

I went to the Mornington Peninsula for the Winter Wine Festival with a group of friends and it was great fun. On the first day, we went to the main festival area where all of the wineries in the region were available in one place to taste. It was great to try so many different wines in one location, but a little overwhelming. So for the next two days, we toured around by ourselves visiting vineyards one at a time.

The Mornington Peninsula itself is a beautiful part of the world with beautiful beaches, long piers, great lookouts and even a huge hedge maze. I would love to return in the summer months when I am sure the area sparkles even more.

My top 10 wineries in the Mornington Peninsula are:

  1. Box Stallion

Box Stallion was my favourite winery in the Mornington Peninsula as I pretty much liked every wine I tasted here- both red and white. It is now, unfortunately closed.

  1. Foxey’s Hangout

This winery was a highlight as the owner makes and bottles your own personalised bottle of sparkling wine.

  1. Red Hill

Red Hill has the best views over the water. They also have award winning pinot noir’s and chardonnays.

  1. Ten Minutes by Tractor

A cute story about three vineyards that are all ten minutes from each other by tractor gave this winery its name. It is kitschy, but fun, with old style tractors to pose on.

  1. Port Phillip Estate

Port Phillip Estate is well established and well known. All the wines are handpicked and aged in French Oak.

  1. Paringa Estate

This winery has a beautiful dining room overlooking vineyards, with good food. They produce good classic Mornington Peninsula pinot noir.

  1. Vidoni Estate Vineyard

Vidoni Estate Vineyard is surrounded by olive groves producing tasty olives, olive oil and olive-related products.

  1. Willow Creek

This winery makes cool climate single vineyard wines. It is now attached to the Rare Hare restaurant.

  1. Stonier Wines

Stonier Wines is rated five stars by James Halliday. It produces pinot noir, chardonnay and sparkling wines.

  1. Moorooduc Estate

With an unusual and imposing building making this estate memorable, they use Burgundian techniques and focus on matching food with wine.

Happy trails!

Related posts: 10 top wineries to go to in the Barossa10 top wineries to go to in the Hunter ValleyIt’s a winery thing, 10 things to do in the Gold Coast, 10 things to do in Melbourne, 10 things to do in Sydney, 10 things I have learnt from travelling

It’s a winery thing

This month I am super excited to be going on a winery weekend away to the Barossa with a couple of my besties. This will be my third visit to the well-established wine region and it is my favourite in Australia so far due to its historical charm (i.e. old buildings).

I am an avid weekend wine tripper from way back and my husband and I have systematically worked our way around most of the states in Australia by wine region.

We have been to the Hunter Valley 6 times which is known for its Shiraz and Semillon and will be returning in June to prune my husband’s adopted vine at Drayton’s Family Wines. We also travelled to Tasmania in January to check out the Sauvignon Blanc down there.

I’ve sipped Pinot Noir at the Mornington Peninsula (Victoria) Winter Wine festival and had a personalised bottle of champagne made for me the French way. I’ve shared a Chardy with a famous wine dog at Voyager Estate in the Margaret River, WA, learned what a GSM is in McClaren Vale (Grenache, Shiraz, Mourvedre) and how to appreciate a good Riesling in the Clare Valley, SA. Next on the list is the Yarra Valley in VIC.

We usually drag a group of friends along with us and I’ve converted a red drinker to a white drinker and myself from a white drinker to a multi drinker in the process.

So what keeps me coming back for more winery trips?

Wine regions are typically set in scenically beautiful areas and are a great way to see the landscape away from the major cities. I always enjoy discovering a new part of the country this way.

It can be a lovely romantic trip for two and is also a great relaxing weekend away with friends. Even if we have been to a wine region before, going with different people usually means finding new hidden gems along the way.

Most wine regions also have good food to go with their great wine. Some of Australia’s best restaurants seem to be popping up in wine regions.

It’s also not a bad option with the kids. They don’t get bored, you can get tipsy during the day with free tastings (with one designated driver of course) and return to your self-catered apartment at night to polish off some new wine and cheese purchases from the day.

And of course it is the opportunity to try some different wines that peaks our interest. Each winery is a new cellar door to explore and new varieties I’ve never heard of to taste. Discovering a new favourite wine to enjoy when you get back home is one of the best ways to keep the memory of a good trip lasting.

Beautiful surroundings, great friends, good food and tasty wine- what’s not to love?

I can almost taste that Barossa Shiraz now…

Related posts: It’s a French thing, Degustation Delights